Tree Bylaw

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Consultation has concluded

The impacts of climate change are increasingly apparent and the role of tree preservation is a recognized climate mitigation measure. While trees are key to carbon sequestration, they can also play a significant role in storm water management, reducing the urban heat island effect, providing habitat and enhancing biodiversity, and their inherent aesthetic and cultural value reflect the importance of a healthy urban forest.

Council identified a Tree Protection Review in the 2019 Strategic Plan. Staff initiated a review of the current Tree Bylaw and, with the help of a consultant, drafted a new Tree Management Bylaw. In October, Council endorsed the next step of the project, community engagement.

The impacts of climate change are increasingly apparent and the role of tree preservation is a recognized climate mitigation measure. While trees are key to carbon sequestration, they can also play a significant role in storm water management, reducing the urban heat island effect, providing habitat and enhancing biodiversity, and their inherent aesthetic and cultural value reflect the importance of a healthy urban forest.

Council identified a Tree Protection Review in the 2019 Strategic Plan. Staff initiated a review of the current Tree Bylaw and, with the help of a consultant, drafted a new Tree Management Bylaw. In October, Council endorsed the next step of the project, community engagement.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    Is the municipality considering leaf/branch pick up or drop off. Currently there is a large cost to dispose of this to those who have high numbers of protected trees on their property. I will have 14 under new bylaw and currently pay for yard waste pick up but still have massive amounts in my yard. I am forced to pay to remove or burn (which I prefer not to do).

    Matt Barker asked 8 months ago

    This is not currently being undertaken and a service such as this is not planned by the District at this time. Private companies may offer pick up and drop off services but these would not be part of municipal operations.

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    Has any consideration been given to reduction of high allergen trees when replacements are planted, particularly in village core areas? This would reduce seasonal allergies for many in the community. http://www.allergyfree-gardening.com/opals.html

    DBW asked 6 months ago

    This aspect of trees has not yet been taken into consideration with the current draft. It is something we can present to Council and ask if it can be included in a future update. We expect to update the bylaw in the future to determine if more species need to be added to the protected’ list and add other aspects that need to be taken into consideration, such as allergens.

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    We have 2 Arbutus trees on our property at 6393 Rodolph Road. This year the trees look to be in declining condition. What is the correct procedure for getting these trees diagnosed? Thanks for taking this question.

    Doug Gillespie asked 5 months ago

    Hello, Could you please email Ivo.Vanderkamp@csaanich.ca for specific tree inquiries. Thank you.

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    Is there a plan to implement service guidelines with respect to permit issuance. This has been poor in past, even for danger/diseased/dead trees. Is the municipality planning to have someone on staff with more formal arborist experience.

    Matt Barker asked 8 months ago

    We aim to issue a permit within two weeks once a complete application is received. For danger trees and/or emergency removal, the current bylaw (Section 11) as well as the draft new bylaw (Section 5(3)) allow for removal without a permit as long as the Director is notified by the owner no more than 72 hours (current bylaw) after the removal has occurred or has applied for a permit within 24 hours (proposed bylaw) of removal. 

    The bylaw leans on professional arborists hired by property owners to assess and provide recommendations as currently there is no staff with arborist credentials. 

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    Neighbours in Brentwood Bay have Cedar Leylandii that are now full grown (60 feet plus). These trees have many large (20 feet plus) broken branches that are hanging high in the trees. What can be done to mitigate the damage that can be caused by these in high winds as we have recently seen when the owners do not maintain them.

    choose hope asked 8 months ago

    This would be a matter between property owners. The District cannot issue a permit for tree removal or pruning of a tree on a neighbouring property. If the branches overhang the property line they can be pruned as long as it does not (fatally) damage the tree. The owner of the tree would need to give permission. The neighbour can have an arborist assess the tree and provide the neighbour with the assessment to put them ‘on notice’ that the tree (or branches) is hazardous. This may help if something does happen and the insurance companies get involved.

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    What is a Permit Tree?

    water boy asked 8 months ago

    A ‘permit’ tree is a ‘protected’ tree under the current bylaw. This includes municipal trees, any tree over 60 cm DBH, certain species of trees (Arbutus, Garry Oak), trees in the Erosion District and trees required by covenant or development permit.