Tree Bylaw

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The District of Central Saanich is updating the Tree Protection Bylaw.

The impacts of climate change are increasingly apparent and the role of tree preservation is a recognized climate mitigation measure. While trees are key to carbon sequestration, they can also play a significant role in storm water management, reducing the urban heat island effect, providing habitat and enhancing biodiversity, and their inherent aesthetic and cultural value reflect the importance of a healthy urban forest.

Council identified a Tree Protection Review in the 2019 Strategic Plan. Staff initiated a review of the current Tree Bylaw and, with the help of a consultant, drafted a new Tree Management Bylaw. In October, Council endorsed the next step of the project, community engagement. In this phase, the District is asking for input on the draft bylaw.

The District of Central Saanich is updating the Tree Protection Bylaw.

The impacts of climate change are increasingly apparent and the role of tree preservation is a recognized climate mitigation measure. While trees are key to carbon sequestration, they can also play a significant role in storm water management, reducing the urban heat island effect, providing habitat and enhancing biodiversity, and their inherent aesthetic and cultural value reflect the importance of a healthy urban forest.

Council identified a Tree Protection Review in the 2019 Strategic Plan. Staff initiated a review of the current Tree Bylaw and, with the help of a consultant, drafted a new Tree Management Bylaw. In October, Council endorsed the next step of the project, community engagement. In this phase, the District is asking for input on the draft bylaw.

Questions

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    Neighbours in Brentwood Bay have Cedar Leylandii that are now full grown (60 feet plus). These trees have many large (20 feet plus) broken branches that are hanging high in the trees. What can be done to mitigate the damage that can be caused by these in high winds as we have recently seen when the owners do not maintain them.

    choose hope asked 5 days ago

    This would be a matter between property owners. The District cannot issue a permit for tree removal or pruning of a tree on a neighbouring property. If the branches overhang the property line they can be pruned as long as it does not (fatally) damage the tree. The owner of the tree would need to give permission. The neighbour can have an arborist assess the tree and provide the neighbour with the assessment to put them ‘on notice’ that the tree (or branches) is hazardous. This may help if something does happen and the insurance companies get involved.

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    What is a Permit Tree?

    water boy asked 3 days ago

    A ‘permit’ tree is a ‘protected’ tree under the current bylaw. This includes municipal trees, any tree over 60 cm DBH, certain species of trees (Arbutus, Garry Oak), trees in the Erosion District and trees required by covenant or development permit.