Review and Comment on the 2019 Budget

Each year, with value to the taxpayer in mind, staff and Council determine how to maintain our community with the minimal necessary tax increase.

Like other Canadian municipalities, Central Saanich must balance a budget that accounts for inflation, maintaining service delivery and planning for the future—which includes preparing for future requirements for aging infrastructure, climate change and emergency management.


We're listening

The 2019 Draft Financial Plan is prepared by staff, made available for public comment, and then presented to Council for consideration in a series of presentations from February 19 to March 19, 2019. Please provide your input by February 15, so it can be provided to Council prior to the budget meetings. (For budget meetings, please see the Key Dates on the right of this page.)

Take Central Saanich's 2019 Balance the Budget Challenge! Learn where your tax dollars go and tell us about your priorities.


2019 draft budget highlights

This year, in addition to maintaining services to our growing community, the draft budget includes new expenditures:

  • paying the new Employer Health Tax (an initiative of the Provincial Government, the tax eliminates the Medical Services Plan (MSP) premiums for all British Columbians and is offset through an annual tax on remuneration paid to employees).
  • investing in public safety (joining the regional integrated police 9-1-1 dispatch and the second year of a five-year plan to improve the fire service response model), and
  • putting away for future infrastructure replacement (to reach a sustainable funding level for maintenance and repairs to aging infrastructure; we are in year two of a 15-year plan).

This year’s proposed budget is based on a property tax increase of 4.3%. This is higher than the District would normally like to see a tax increase but 2019 is a challenging year from many municipalities due to the new Provincial Employer Health Tax requirement and increasing police dispatch costs.

Central Saanich, like other municipalities, offers a broad range of services but has limited revenue sources and we are focused on the long-term and prudent fiscal management.

Services Central Saanich provides: Legislative and Administrative Services, Finance, Policing, Fire Protection, Planning, Building Inspections, Bylaw Enforcement, Community Services, Civil Engineering and Public Works Services including Roads, Drainage, Water, Sewer, and Parks maintenance.

Questions? Please feel free to pop by our upcoming budget events in the community, post a question on this page, phone Municipal Hall Monday to Friday between 8:30 am and 4:30 pm at 250.652.4444 or email us!

Each year, with value to the taxpayer in mind, staff and Council determine how to maintain our community with the minimal necessary tax increase.

Like other Canadian municipalities, Central Saanich must balance a budget that accounts for inflation, maintaining service delivery and planning for the future—which includes preparing for future requirements for aging infrastructure, climate change and emergency management.


We're listening

The 2019 Draft Financial Plan is prepared by staff, made available for public comment, and then presented to Council for consideration in a series of presentations from February 19 to March 19, 2019. Please provide your input by February 15, so it can be provided to Council prior to the budget meetings. (For budget meetings, please see the Key Dates on the right of this page.)

Take Central Saanich's 2019 Balance the Budget Challenge! Learn where your tax dollars go and tell us about your priorities.


2019 draft budget highlights

This year, in addition to maintaining services to our growing community, the draft budget includes new expenditures:

  • paying the new Employer Health Tax (an initiative of the Provincial Government, the tax eliminates the Medical Services Plan (MSP) premiums for all British Columbians and is offset through an annual tax on remuneration paid to employees).
  • investing in public safety (joining the regional integrated police 9-1-1 dispatch and the second year of a five-year plan to improve the fire service response model), and
  • putting away for future infrastructure replacement (to reach a sustainable funding level for maintenance and repairs to aging infrastructure; we are in year two of a 15-year plan).

This year’s proposed budget is based on a property tax increase of 4.3%. This is higher than the District would normally like to see a tax increase but 2019 is a challenging year from many municipalities due to the new Provincial Employer Health Tax requirement and increasing police dispatch costs.

Central Saanich, like other municipalities, offers a broad range of services but has limited revenue sources and we are focused on the long-term and prudent fiscal management.

Services Central Saanich provides: Legislative and Administrative Services, Finance, Policing, Fire Protection, Planning, Building Inspections, Bylaw Enforcement, Community Services, Civil Engineering and Public Works Services including Roads, Drainage, Water, Sewer, and Parks maintenance.

Questions? Please feel free to pop by our upcoming budget events in the community, post a question on this page, phone Municipal Hall Monday to Friday between 8:30 am and 4:30 pm at 250.652.4444 or email us!

  • If you had $1,000...

    The municipality has infrastructure (such as buildings, parks, sewer systems) that require investments each year. Like most municipalities, there is less funding available from other levels of government than there used to be, and we are working to reach sustainable funding over time. 

    With the limited funding we have, we make decisions each year about where to invest on large projects, known as capital projects.

    Imagine you have $1,000 to spend on capital projects. How would you allocate your dollars? 

    The municipality has infrastructure (such as buildings, parks, sewer systems) that require investments each year. Like most municipalities, there is less funding available from other levels of government than there used to be, and we are working to reach sustainable funding over time. 

    With the limited funding we have, we make decisions each year about where to invest on large projects, known as capital projects.

    Imagine you have $1,000 to spend on capital projects. How would you allocate your dollars? 

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